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Poincaré Webinar Series on Optical Polarization and Related Phenomena
This interdisciplinary series will bring together speakers from across the globe to explore topics derived from Henri Poincaré’s work on optical polarization. The interactive investigations will also demonstrate contemporary applications of polarization techniques in various research areas – including materials science, remote sensing, biomedical optics, and astronomy – and how they relate to each other and are extended, for example, to non-paraxial optics. Join SPIE and the series’ chairs and moderators – Thomas A. Germer, National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA); Jessica C. Ramella-Roman, Florida International University (USA); and Tatiana Novikova, École Polytechnique (France) – and be part of these exciting discussions.

Tuesday, 29 September, 8:00 am PT (1500 UTC):
The Poincaré sphere: its generalizations and their several applications in optics
Speaker: Miguel Alonso, Institut Fresnel (France)

Description: A discussion focusing on the concept of the Poincaré sphere and its applications in optics, not only for describing paraxial polarization but also the spatial structure of optical beams, both within the ray and wave models. Also considered: generalizations of the Poincaré sphere for the case of non-paraxial polarization (where all three field components are important), and their application in a novel technique for fluorescent microscopy.
Sep 29, 2020 08:00 AM
Oct 27, 2020 06:00 AM
Nov 24, 2020 05:00 AM
Jan 26, 2021 05:00 AM
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Speakers

Miguel Alonso, Institut Fresnel (France)
Tuesday, 29 September, 8:00 am PT (1500 UTC): The Poincaré sphere: its generalizations and their several applications in optics
A discussion focusing on the concept of the Poincaré sphere and its applications in optics, not only for describing paraxial polarization but also the spatial structure of optical beams, both within the ray and wave models. Also considered: generalizations of the Poincaré sphere for the case of non-paraxial polarization (where all three field components are important), and their application in a novel technique for fluorescent microscopy. Biography: Engineer in Physics from the Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico; PhD in Optics, Univ. of Rochester) Faculty of The Institute of Optics, 2003, and since 2018 has been based at the Institut Fresnel and the Ecole Centrale (France). His research focuses on mathematical aspects of wave propagation, in particular on the description and applications of beams with structured intensity and polarization distributions, optical coherence, and the connection between the ray and wave models of light.
Federico Capasso, Harvard University (USA)
Tuesday, 27 October, 6:00 am PT (1300 UTC): Metasurface Polarization Optics
Metasurfaces, subwavelength spaced arrays of phase shifting elements, enable spatially varying control of polarization. I will discuss J-plates, metasurface devices that impart two arbitrary orbital angular momentum (OAM) states on an arbitrary orthogonal polarization and their application in high OAM lasing and a new class of polarizers and waveplates that change their behavior along the beam’s axis, thereby generating structured light with a polarization state the can traverse any trajectory on the Poincare’ sphere. In metamaterials with freeform meta-atoms, one can engineer the optical anisotropy such that light sees different indices for arbitrary—linear, circular, or elliptical—orthogonal eigen-polarization states. Using topology-optimized metasurfaces, we demonstrated this arbitrary birefringence. It has the unique feature that it can be continuously tuned from linear to elliptical birefringence, by changing the angle of incidence ...
Frans Snik, Universiteit Leiden (Netherlands)
24 November, 5:00 am PT (1300 UTC): The answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything is… polarization!
The vast majority of information about our universe comes to us in the form of light. The polarization of the light from astronomical objects can uniquely elucidate, for example, their substructures and magnetic fields. The discussion will explore how we combine polarimetry at systems level with adaptive optics, wavefront sensing, and coronagraphy, all of which employ polarization-based and liquid-crystal techniques and enable broadband operation and spectroscopy/spectropolarimetry. We are developing dedicated spectropolarimeters to observe the Earth-as-an-exoplanet from the ISS and from the Moon, and perform circular polarimetric observations of vegetation and beetles to establish remote-sensing of homochirality as a powerful biomarker. All this work also leads to spin-offs in Earth observation, such as measuring the effects of air pollution on our climate and health.